Tuesday, August 23, 2011

Advice For New Teachers

I believe that teaching has to be one of the most rewarding yet challenging professions, but I couldn't imagine doing anything else.  Here is my top tips for new (and experienced) teachers.

  • Don't get too caught up in decorating and making everything look perfect.  Yes, it's certainly important and fun, but I believe really diving into the curriculum and planning for awesome instruction is just as important.
  • Procedures, procedures, procedures!  I can't emphasize it enough.  Never assume students will know how to do anything.  We spend days going over every little aspect of how I want our day to run, and it really pays off during the year.  I always feel silly teaching things like 'how to use our pencil sharpener' or 'how to sit on the rug', but it is so worth it.
  • When it comes to behavior, consistency is key.  Students should know exactly what is expected of them.  If you tell your students you're going to do something-do it. 
  • Be flexible and ready for anything.  When you work with children (and unpredictable administration), you can almost guarantee that things will not go exactly as planned.  Be ready to roll with the punches:  fire alarms, surprise assemblies, sick children, picture day, an insect found in your classroom, parents who show up unexpectedly, etc.  I once had a parent surprise me by bringing a goat to my classroom during the middle of the day.  
  • Go home!  I truly believe I could get to school an hour early every day, stay until 6, take work home every night, work on the weekends and still never feel caught up.  A teacher's work is never done!  Two years ago I gave myself a new rule-I could only stay late one day a week.  Every other day I made myself leave at a reasonable hour and only take important things home with me.  I had tendency to become a school hermit, but I feel that I'm a better teacher when I give myself a break each day and enjoy spending time with my family.
  • Surround yourself with positive coworkers.  There are almost always pockets of negativity in schools and stay far, far away.  It will suck you in and drown your enthusiasm and enjoyment of your job faster than you would ever imagine.
  • Don't be too hard on yourself.  It's so easy for me to get down and feel like I've failed my students when I have students not meet DIBELS benchmarks, DRA benchmarks, RTI goals, and our big state test, and on and on.  It's so important to remember to look at your students' growth and think about the progress they made during the year.   
  • Don't lose sight of the big picture.  It's easy to get caught up in the details and forget that you have the most incredible job.  Of course I want my students to be successful academically, but it is even more important for me to know that I've made my students feel loved, respected, and appreciated. 

Now it's your turn to share.  Just click on the link!

      11 comments:

      Ashley M. said...

      I really enjoyed reading your post. I hope you do not mind, but I copied it into a word document and am printing it off to keep in my notebook of important things to remember for my first year (next year!) Thank you so much for sharing all of these very informative and important tips that are not always stressed for pre-service teachers!

      Sarah Kate Triebel said...

      Asheigh- Thanks for the comment on my blog. I completely agree with surrounding yourself with positive people. No energy vampires! I'm a follower now. Thanks again- Sarah

      http://sktriebel.blogspot.com/

      Erin said...

      I love your idea of allowing yourself to stay late only one night a week! That is one thing I'm awful about! I have the hardest time making myself go home! I'm going to have to try your idea!

      K. Mo said...

      A goat???! Geeze. We had a snake in the bathroom today. Luckily no kids in the building yet. Thanks for your comment on my blog. I am also a new follower!

      ❤ Karen
      Flamingo Fabulous in Second Grade

      Lindsay said...

      A goat? Seriously. Some people are crazy. I liked your advice though.

      Ashleigh said...

      You can't make this stuff up! I was so stunned I couldn't think of anything to say. I just stood there.

      Busy Bees said...

      Just found your blog and love your advice!! It is that you can't do it all and need a break!! Go home is great advice to give for the first year. I still need it after more than 20 years!!
      BusyBees

      emilyjsimpson said...

      These are all great points! I definitely agree that being surrounded with positive people is so important. One of my biggest fears in teaching is that i'll lose my passion for it and become negative. i want to surround myself with other passionate people so we can constantly encourage and help one another.
      I'm starting my student teaching very soon, so i value all the advice i can get! thanks for sharing :)

      Maria said...

      Can't believe you had a parent bring in a goat! That's crazy! Love the advice.. Everything you mention makes so much sense and is so true! Thanks for the comment on my blog... I'm a new follower too!
      Maria
      Charmedinthirdgrade.blogspot.com

      Jenna Bailey said...

      Loved this post. You make a lot of good points that are good for all of us in the teaching profession! It IS easy to lose sight of things, especially at the beginning of the year before things become more routine. Just what I needed to hear :)

      Michelle said...

      Thanks for a great post. I am a new teacher this year starting in 2 weeks (In Australia this is the start of our school year). This is really great advice and I will try hard to follow it, though I think I will struggle not to decorate to much haha. Love that a parent brought a goat in- that is awesome!!! What a crazy day that must have been :-)

      Michelle
      http://bloggingteachingandsecondgradeohmy.blogspot.com/

      Post a Comment